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 Cupcake Containers
Cupcake containrs
There is no set size for a cup cake. It's agreed that it is a mini cake, but is it muffin size (left case above) or standard baking case size (right case above)?
We examine which produces the best cup cake.

We tested out two case sizes, the muffin case and the standard baking cake size. We then tried both of them out when they were set in a baking tray for support.

Plain cupcake made in a standard container First we baked a cupcake in a standard small paper container placed on an open baking sheet. This produced a shallow cup cake with a slightly rounded top.

The base of the cup cake was significantly narrower compared to the top.

We then baked a cupcake in a muffin paper container, this is significantly larger than the standard cup cake. The results were similar to the above but larger.

We felt that more height would give a better appearance to the cupcake. To achieve this we set the filled cases in a metal muffin tray as shown below.

On the left are the standard paper containers in a metal muffin tray. To the right are the muffin paper containers. In the middle we have set the mixture directly into the metal muffin case. All were filled to about half the depth of the container.
There was no difference in taste but the mixture set directly into the muffin tray (middle row) resulted in a very domed top which was not good.

Cupcakes baked in a metal muffin tray

The standard paper containers gave better results when in the metal tray because the sides were better supported. The support of the metal tray gave the cupcakes more height. Muffin and standard containers both gave good results when supported by the metal tin.

The cakes in the middle of the tray were judged to be too large for a cupcake.

Having decided that cases, supported by a metal baking case gave the best results we then tested out what mixture amount in the cases gave the best result. Most recipes recommend just under or just over half full. Looking at our results we thought that maybe two thirds full would give better results. It would add more height to the cupcake.


Filled

We filled up the containers to varying depths and concluded that filling to somewhere between two thirds and three quarters gave the best results. This gave good height.


Baked


Just to complicate matters, if you are serious about your cupcakes, there are several other types of cupcake cases. Some paper cases are decorated (right front). There are also foil cases, gold, silver and decorated. These foil cases provide more support compared to the paper ones and do not require support from a metal baking case.

Finally, towards the back of the picture are foil "sweet cases". These are much smaller than the other cases and give you bite sized cup cakes. Great for kids to bake, decorate and eat. Mums (and dads) will love them as a birthday present or for mothering / father's day.

Some supermarkets stock the basic foil cupcake containers but, for a full range, you either need to order them online or visit your local cooking shop.

BACK TO BASIC CUP CAKE PAGE


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