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 Neck of Lamb

The name of this cut of meat, "neck of lamb" is self-explanatory. Very similar is neck of mutton, with mutton just being an older lamb.

For lamb, this is a relatively cheap cut of meat with a mixture of fat and meat. If you ask for this cut at a butcher's the first question he will ask is do you want it on or off the bone. Your recipe should specify this but there are some general rules.


Neck of lamb uncooked Neck of lamb off the bone is the easiest to manage in a recipe because when the meat is cooked you won't need to fiddle around removing the meat from the bone. But most recipes which require neck of lamb will cook it for a long time in liquid. In these cases 'on the bone' is best because the bone will contribute immensely to the flavour.

A good example of this is Scotch Broth. Click the picture above to see an enlarged version.

Neck of lamb is a tough joint so it needs lots of gentle cooking to turn it into tender meat, two and a half to three hours and upwards is needed on a lowish heat in stock, a sauce or water. But the amount of tender meat produced is excellent value and well worth the effort. Aside from Scotch Broth, neck of lamb makes an excellent Rogan Josh, Irish Stew or Lancashire Hotpot.

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