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 Celery Soup

Mrs Beeton Recipes Index Page

Estimated Time: 1 hr 10 min

Servings: 4 bowls of soup

Non-standard Cooking Utensils: A large pan.


Ingredients for Celery Soup:

150 ml ( pint) of strong stock

850 ml (1 pints) of boiling water

4 heads of celery

190 ml (1/3 pint) cream

teaspoon salt

teaspoon nutmeg

teaspoon sugar

Cooking Method for Celery Soup

1 Place the water, celery, salt, nutmeg and sugar in a pan and simmer for half an hour.
2 Remove the pulp by passing the mixture through a sieve.
3 Add the stock and stir in well.
4 Add the cream, stirring in well. Bring to boil and remove immediately the mixture begins to boil.
5 Serve immediately in warm soup bowls with French bread or croutons.

CELERY
This plant is indigenous to Britain, and, in its wild state, grows by the side of ditches and along some parts of the seacoast. In this state it is called smallaqe, and, to some extent, is a dangerous narcotic. By cultivation, however, it has been brought to the fine flavour which the garden plant possesses.

In the vicinity of Manchester it is raised to an enormous size. When our natural observation is assisted by the accurate results ascertained by the light of science, how infinitely does it enhance our delight in contemplating the products of nature! To know, for example, that the endless variety of colour which we see in plants is developed only by the rays of the sun, is to know a truism sublime by its very comprehensiveness.

The cause of the whiteness of celery is nothing more than the want of light in its vegetation, and in order that this effect may be produced, the plant is almost wholly covered with earth; the tops of the leaves alone being suffered to appear above the ground.

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