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 Apple Soup

Mrs Beeton Recipes Index Page

Estimated Preparation Time: 10 minutes

Estimated Cooking Time: 1 hr

Servings: 4 bowls of soup

Non-standard Cooking Utensils: A large pan.


Ingredients:

350 g (12 oz) of cooking or desert apples

¼ teaspoon of pepper

2 cloves

pinch of cayenne pepper or ginger

2 pints medium stock or vegetable stock

Cooking Method

1. Peel and quarter the apples, taking out their cores

2. Put them into the stock, stew them gently for one hour till tender

3. Pass the liquid through a strainer

4. Add the seasoning, give it one boil up, and serve.

THE APPLE
This useful fruit is mentioned in Holy Writ; and Homer describes it as valuable in his time. It was brought from the East by the Romans, who held it in the highest estimation. Indeed, some of the citizens of the “Eternal city” distinguished certain favourite apples by their names. Thus the Manlians were called after Manlius, the Claudians after Claudius, and the Appians after Appius. Others were designated after the country whence they were brought; as the Sidonians, the Epirotes, and the Greeks. The best varieties are natives of Asia, and have, by grafting them upon others, been introduced into Europe.

The crab, found in our hedges, is the only variety indigenous to Britain; therefore, for the introduction of other kinds we are, no doubt, indebted to the Romans. In the time of the Saxon heptarchy, both Devon and Somerset were distinguished as the apple country; and there are still existing in Herefordshire some trees said to have been planted in the time of William the Conqueror. From that time to this, the varieties of this precious fruit have gone on increasing, and are now said to number upwards of 1,500. It is peculiar to the temperate zone, being found neither in Lapland, nor within the tropics.

The best baking apples for early use are the Colvilles; the best for autumn are the rennets and pearmains; and the best for winter and spring are russets. The best table, or eating apples, are the Margarets for early use; the Kentish codlin and summer pearmain for summer; and for autumn, winter, or spring, the Dowton, golden and other pippins, as the ribstone, with small russets. As a food, the apple cannot be considered to rank high, as more than the half of it consists of water, and the rest of its properties are not the most nourishing. It is, however, a useful adjunct to other kinds of food, and, when cooked, is esteemed as slightly laxative.

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